Poxviridae

The definitions used in this glossary of terminology either have been provided by the authors of the articles, or have been extracted wholly or in part, or paraphrased from the following sources: The American Medical Association Encyclopedia of Medicine, Charles B. Clayman, MD, Medical Editor, Random House, New York, 1989; Biotechnology from A to Z, 2d Edition, William Bains, Oxford University Press, New York, New York, 2002; A Dictionary of Genetics, 6th Edition, Robert C. King and William D. Stansfield, Oxford University Press, New York, New York, 2002; Dorland's Illustrated Medical Dictionary, 29th and 30th Editions, W. B. Saunders Company, Philadelphia, 2000, 2003; Genes VII, Benjamin Lewin, Oxford University Press, New York, New York, 2000; The Gale Encyclopedia of Genetic Disorders, Volumes I and II, Stacey L. Blachford, Ed., Thomson Learning, New York, New York, 2002; The Merriam-Webster Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, Inc., Springfield, Massachusetts, 1997; Molecular Biology of the Cell, 3rd Edition, Bruce Alberts, et al., Garland Publishing, 1994; The Random House Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged Edition, 1966; Webster's Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary, 1991.

DEFINITION:

Poxviridae
The poxviruses: a family of DNA viruses having a brick-shaped or ovoid virion 220-450 x 140-260 nm consisting of an envelope containing lipid and tubular or globular protein structures surrounding a DNA-containing core and one or two lateral bodies. The genome consists of a single molecule of double-stranded DNA (size 130-375 kbp). Viruses contain over 100 proteins; some are ether-resistant while others are ether-sensitive. Replication and assembly occur in the cytoplasm; virions are released by cell destruction or budding. Host range is narrow and transmission is by fomites, airborne particles, arthropod vectors, or contact. There are two subfamilies: Chordopoxvirinae (poxviruses of vertebrates) and Entomopoxvirinae (poxviruses of insects).