tetracyclines

The definitions used in this glossary of terminology either have been provided by the authors of the articles, or have been extracted wholly or in part, or paraphrased from the following sources: The American Medical Association Encyclopedia of Medicine, Charles B. Clayman, MD, Medical Editor, Random House, New York, 1989; Biotechnology from A to Z, 2d Edition, William Bains, Oxford University Press, New York, New York, 2002; A Dictionary of Genetics, 6th Edition, Robert C. King and William D. Stansfield, Oxford University Press, New York, New York, 2002; Dorland's Illustrated Medical Dictionary, 29th and 30th Editions, W. B. Saunders Company, Philadelphia, 2000, 2003; Genes VII, Benjamin Lewin, Oxford University Press, New York, New York, 2000; The Gale Encyclopedia of Genetic Disorders, Volumes I and II, Stacey L. Blachford, Ed., Thomson Learning, New York, New York, 2002; The Merriam-Webster Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, Inc., Springfield, Massachusetts, 1997; Molecular Biology of the Cell, 3rd Edition, Bruce Alberts, et al., Garland Publishing, 1994; The Random House Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged Edition, 1966; Webster's Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary, 1991.

DEFINITION:

tetracyclines
1. Any of a group of biosynthetic antibiotics; some are isolated from certain species of Streptomyces and others are produced semisynthetically by catalytic hydrogenation of chlortetracycline or oxytetracycline. The group includes chlortetracycline, oxytetracycline, tetracycline (See definition 2), demeclocycline, rolitetracycline, methacycline, doxycycline, and minocycline. Tetracyclines are effective against a wide variety of organisms, including gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, rickettsias, mycoplasmas, chlamydias, and certain viruses, protozoa, and actinomycetes.

2. [USP] A semisynthetic antibiotic, having the same wide spectrum of antimicrobial activity as other members of the tetracycline group; used as an antibacterial, antirickettsial, and antiamebic; administered orally.