Golgi Complex

The definitions used in this glossary of terminology either have been provided by the authors of the articles, or have been extracted wholly or in part, or paraphrased from the following sources: The American Medical Association Encyclopedia of Medicine, Charles B. Clayman, MD, Medical Editor, Random House, New York, 1989; Biotechnology from A to Z, 2d Edition, William Bains, Oxford University Press, New York, New York, 2002; A Dictionary of Genetics, 6th Edition, Robert C. King and William D. Stansfield, Oxford University Press, New York, New York, 2002; Dorland's Illustrated Medical Dictionary, 29th and 30th Editions, W. B. Saunders Company, Philadelphia, 2000, 2003; Genes VII, Benjamin Lewin, Oxford University Press, New York, New York, 2000; The Gale Encyclopedia of Genetic Disorders, Volumes I and II, Stacey L. Blachford, Ed., Thomson Learning, New York, New York, 2002; The Merriam-Webster Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, Inc., Springfield, Massachusetts, 1997; Molecular Biology of the Cell, 3rd Edition, Bruce Alberts, et al., Garland Publishing, 1994; The Random House Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged Edition, 1966; Webster's Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary, 1991.

DEFINITION:

Golgi Complex
A complex cup-like structure within cells, made up of several elements, each consisting of a number of flattened sacs (cisternae) with associated vacuoles and vesicles. Golgi complexes are membrane sites of the formation of the carbohydrate side chains of glycoproteins and mucopolysaccharides, and of other substances. The secretion vacuoles migrate through the cell membrane and release the glycoproteins and mucopolysaccharides, and thus play a role in internal and external secretion. Cytochemical studies have shown that they are also sites of formation of primary lysosomes and give rise to the acrosome of spermatozoa and the nematocyst of Hydra. Called also Golgi apparatus and Golgi body.